Search Results

Your search for "Center for Theology and Public Life" returned 43 results.

Showing 1 - 10 of 43 results.

Filter by…
Sort by…
Display…
Video | Higher Education >
Christian Faith, Moral Values and Public Service: Two Views from Capitol Hill
Mercer University's Center for Theology »
Blog Entry | Spiritual Growth >
Based on a nationwide representative sampling of more than 4200 young people and adults the survey data show that people from ages 5 through 13 have a 32% probability of accepting Christ as their Saviour. Young people from the ages of 14 through 18 have just a 4% likelihood of doing so while adults (ages 19 through death) have only a 6% probability of making that choice.(Barna Research Group)  What's up with that? Is this for real? Is God les»
Group
  • Member count: 16
  • Location: Atlanta, GA

About Center for Theology and Public Life:

The Mercer Center for Theology and Public Life (CTPL) promotes public dialogue, research, and constructive solutions related to important public issues to which theology and ethical reflection can make a significant contribution. The CTPL plans, hosts, and supports events that model civic, constructive, and substantive conversation about major issues in public life such as poverty and economic justice, human rights, crime and the death penalty, international peacemaking, biomedical ethics, family and sexuality, church-state relations, national identity, immigration, et ...

Article | Politics >
 
Dr. David Gushee believes that sometimes the conversations that are uncomfortable are the most important. As Mercer University's D»
Video | Public Policy >
Book: Religious Faith, Torture, and Our National Soul
Center for Theology and Public Life Dire»
Blog Entry | Christian Living >
When my parents became Christian in the late 1970s, one of the first things they did was send me to private Christian School. More than anything, they wanted to protect me from the world. Secular culture was something to be feared. The world was a scary place and public middle school and high school seemed to typify the scariness of our society. My parents were anything but wealthy, but they made the decision to send me to a private Christian mi»
Blog Entry | Higher Education >
CBF_photoThis past April Dr. David Gushee, in cooperation with the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s Resource Center, facilitated a national conference on “Sexuality and Covenant.”  Before the conference Dr. Gushee wrote an article for the Associated Baptist Press discussing seven presuppositions for the conference and then reflected on how the conference handled them in another article for ABP the week after the conference.  Below»
Blog Entry | Theology >
A little revolution now and then is a healthy thing, don't you think? Captain Marko Ramius, The Hunt For Red October [1]I hold it, that a little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. - Thomas Jefferson [2]The church has faced many changes throughout history and they have come in many forms. In the 1600's, the church came up against scientific evidence in the form of Galileo's»
Blog Entry | Spiritual Growth >
I don't know if you had a chance to see the movie Life of Pi, but I would HIGHLY recommend seeing it.  The DVD is on sale today, and I took my daughter and a friend last night to one of the final showings in our small Gaslight Theater here in Durango.   I saw Pi a couple of months ago, and I forgot what an incredible story it is.  A Young Indian boy stranded on a life boat with nothing but a few cans of water, a few packages of biscuits, and a»
Blog Entry | Blogs >
This is a bit of a theological post, but I think it is an important topic. In the course of a discussion with some awesome guys on Facebook, this article by Michael Horton was referenced: http://www.whitehorseinn.org/blog/2012/03/20/holiness-wars-what-is-antinomianism/ I found myself vaguely disturbed by it, so I wanted to work through its points a little more carefully. Defining Antinomianism Horton writes: Defining Antinomianism: Literally »